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Diaphoretic

Bay Laurel

Antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, relaxing, soothing

  • Laurus Nobilis L
  • EWG Rating: 0

Ginger

The aromatic rhizome of Zingiber officinale is the source of ginger, a spice used for centuries to add flavour in cooking. In Asia the fresh stem is an essential ingredient of many dishes, whereas the dried, powdered spice is more popular in European cooking. Gingerbread, one of the most popular uses for ginger in Britain, dates to Anglo-Saxon times when preserved ginger (produced by boiling the rhizome in sugar syrup) was used, often medicinally.

  • Zingiber officinalis
  • EWG Rating: 0

Lemon

A semi-drying oil obtained from the seed is used in soap making. An essential oil from the peel is used as a food flavouring and also in perfumery and medicines. A higher quality essential oil is obtained from the flowers. The peel contains 0.4% essential oil. An essential oil obtained from the leaves and young twigs is called 'petitgrain oil'. Yields are around 0.4%.

  • Citrus limonum
  • EWG Rating: 0

Lime

Cooling, tortifying, refreshing, toning

  • Citrus aurantifolia
  • EWG Rating: 0

Marjoram

Aids in respiration and digestion; muscle relaxant; calming, fortifying, sedating.

  • Origanum majorana
  • EWG Rating: 0

Melissa

Lemon Balm has long been known for its aromatic qualities and its culinary uses. The Greeks used Lemon Balm to treat insomnia, to calm nerves and alleviate anxiety. It was used as an ingredient in Mediterranean dishes, as a garnish, as an additive to flavor deserts, to make hot and cold teas, and as a flavoring agent in candies and gums; its essential oils were used in much the same manner as spearmint oil. Lemon Balm is also one of the psychoactive ingredients used to make the historically renowned Absinthe.

  • Melissa officinalis
  • EWG Rating: 4
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